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to the trading day. investors are waiting for the results of greece's bond buyback program occurs. joe has some of the big corporate news and this one is actually a global corporate story. >> hsbc. we're talking about paying $1.9 billion in the money lawnering lapses. a brirchb lender admitting to a breakdown of controls, in a statement announcing a deferred payment. yesterday standard chartered agreed to pay $27 million agreeing that it violates sanctions against iran and two other international companies. >> if you're an international bank and you prael without getting into this kind of trouble? >> no. >> can you actually operate without money laundering? >> i'm just saying, if you're going to be in business in all these types of markets, isn't this going to happen? >> aren't there sxwier countries that would be probably -- that it would stead if you don't want any business tale. >> was there a fascination in this country about whether you want to indict the whole institution or what happens systemically. >> is this your sequel? >> i was on the phone last night. one of the two publishers that
rather than contraction. it's been since october of last year. also abroad greece announcing it will buy back bonds through a dutch auction. the set up whether allow athenss to assess the level of demand before setting a final bryce for the deal. part of the country's efforts to cut its about a along debt. and in germany, merkel is not ruling out the possibility of notifying greece some of its debt once athens finances are in better shape. angela merkel told a german tabloid that the question of the so-called haircut can be revisited. in the past, merkel's government had ruled out forgiving any debt. >> in corporate new, ubs is reportedly close to a settlement. the "new york times" says the swiss bank is expected to pay horn $450 million over claims that some of its employees submitted false libor rates. that's pretty huge story and we will take a look and ten to see what happens with this. also morgan stanley trader is under investigation by cme regulators over trades and treasury futures four years ago. at the time he was employed by goldman sachs. he's now head of global interest rate
of trying euro trend. >> that's fine. >> misery loves company. we can have it all forever, like greece. >> we're not greece. and that's the whole point. neither is britain which is pretending its greece, and look where it's getting them. britain's not growing at all. >> would you do some stimulus? >> i probably would, yeah. >> what kind? >> there's a ton of infrastructure that needs to be done in this country. >> then do it. and borrow money -- >> it's free. we can borrow money for free for 30 years in real terms. the market is not telling the u.s. to tighten fiscal policy. it's telling the u.s. to borrow some money. >> can you make sure we only do things -- we're not going to fill high speed rail lines between cities no one wants to travel to? >> if you spend a billion dollars i can't guarantee that every last cent of it is going to be spent properly. >> how moan solyndras will be in that balance? >> only two. >> you have to deal with the issues that krugman never deals with. i love the explanation we should spend spend spend. what happens when interest rates rise? two is you're talki
heard it compared to the fiscal crisis in greece, 63% had heard it. in that number 36% had read a lot about it or heard a lot about it. do they believe a solution is likely? our numbers different from other poles. americans are more optic. first of all see what they think, unlikely 73% back in november when we asked about the debt program would there be an agreement, 73% saying that, now 44%. the number you want to think is 4% to 44% thinks a solution is likely. who thinks it's likely, that's interesting and driving this number. he can break it down by party. look at what we find, republicans 52-42, independents, i come back here, there we go, independents 47-32 and it's really what you see here 60% of democrats think it's unlikely. i just want to show you again when we get to the issue of 48% to 44% believing it's likely, it's mostly different by democrats. we it break it down further into what people expect, what kind of solutions work? think of this chart as the politician's guide to solving the fiscal cliff and remaining in office. the net percent acceptable minus the percent that
's who -- >> and pay everybody more money. >> they can buy stuff and go back on vacation in greece and all that stuff. >> do we count -- i'm getting -- there's nothing like this to get the twitterers going wild. 1-1-1 is -- 1-1-2001 -- >> 2001? >> yeah. >> yeah? >> 2101. >> yeah? >> less than -- >> you got a zero in there. >> less than 100 years. >> but it's 1-1-1 -- >> but 01 you'd write it probably. >> you would want to get to ten 10-10-10. 10-10-2110. i had someone call me dummy and say -- >> you? >> yeah. said it's 988 years. then he called me a dummy. i tweeted back to the guy, i'm the dummy? i'm the dummy? 988 years? i'm the dummy? the fed is meeting today -- i admit it, i resemble that remark. you're with me, pal. the fed is meeting to discuss whether operation twist will expire at the end of the month. and jerry webman is here. >> i showed up. >> chief economist. >> and union member. >> a unionyist. >> honorary union member. so is leaseman actually. maybe you can -- >> the president -- >> maybe -- you probably with -- >> workers fly i guess. we are strong, solid, more than
. this morning, they agreed finally on the disbursement of aid to greece. some says it removed uncertainty. other investors, not so sure. i wanted to show you the italian curve, italy and spanl wrapping up their fund-raising for the year. their auctions weren't all of that huge, but we are seeing yields fall, prices rise across the board as investors did show up. if we flip over to spain in particular, we can take a look at the three-year over here. a bid to cover ratio of 4.8%. one indication certainly of the kind of indications there are where the ecb is expected to be the most active if and when these countries have to access their bailout programs. now we're seeing prices in spain sell off a little bit. the ten-year, just under 5.4% is the level there. for the longer dated papers, investors are a little bit more wary. now, that news coming out of the euro group meeting, i wanted to show you the euro/dollar as we wrap up today's global market support. it's still down .1%, 1.3056. that would tell you that the resolution is largely priced in. now as focus moves into the start of next year, a cou
of greece. we saw these up in the range of better than 8% earlier. now in the range of 5% to 8%. again, if you look at the levels, you see we're snapping up from low valuations generally speaking. it doesn't take a lot at 63 cents to get an 8% move. >>> quick look over here if you want to take a shot of the wall behind me. it is green for the most part. and greece's borse is one adding 2% today. we're seeing that reflected across the bond space. portugal for example seeing ten-year yields falling. same for spain and italy. the boreses and footy 100, the xetra dax, this has been the outperformer up in the range of 30%. another .3% after the ifo out of germany. came in better than expected. again, a good sign for growth. not necessarily, though, for those who would like to see a weaker europe. the ibex 35 adding 1.3%. and the nikkei, as you mentioned, up above 10,000 for the first time in eight months. adding 2.4%. better hope the moves in the japanese government or bank of japan pan out. we'll get the bank of japan's decision tomorrow. but this comes on the day when, remember, it's on t
legislator of athens in ancient greece. and he replaced the prevailing system at the time of oral, law and blood feud by a written code of rules that could only be enforced by a court. the first court system. so the rules, because they were written, were hard to get around so they were draconian rules, which is where draconian -- draco. >> wasn't he in harry potter, too? >> he was also in harry potter. i don't know.was he? >> i think he was the bad kid growing up. >> and, anyway, with that out of the way and the world hurdling to an end tomorrow, still to come, if you want to know whether or not you should be optimistic about a fiscal cliff deal -- >> oh, draco malfoy. >> oh, yeah, the young bad kid? >> the blond kid. >> he was so good he was bad. check out the markets on any given day and we're going to do just that. tell what's happening with the fiscal cliff. [ penélope ] i found the best cafe in the world. nespresso. where i never have to compromise on anything. ♪ where just one touch creates the perfect coffee. where every cappuccino and latte is only made with fresh milk. and
is considered crucial for greece's efforts to resolve the financial problem. >>> and the european union has fined tv and computer monitor makers about $2 billion saying those companies fixed monitor tube prices for a decade which ended in 2006 talking about companies like philips, lg, and panasonic among the companies fined. philips, which was assessed the biggest chunk of the penalty says it will appeal the ruling. >>> and mortgage applications rose 4.5% last week according to new figures from the mortgage bankers association. most of the increase was accounted for by a rise in refinancing activity. >>> all right. the dollar hitting a six-week low on uncertainty about whether a budget deal would be reached. meantime, oil continues to trade below $90 a barrel. joining us this morning, chief market strategist at worldwide markets. also kevin book who is managing director at clear view energy partners. and joe, let's start off talking about the dollar. i can't make heads or tails of why the dollar is under so much pressure. i know things are bad here, we're worried about the fiscal cliff. but
a year. the equivalent of about $55,000. the current top tax rate in greece is 45% for those earning more than 100,000 euros. finally, business sentiment in europe is slumping in part due to economic uncertainty ahead of this weekend's election. the bank of japan sentiment index dropping to minus 12 from minus 3 in the prior quarter. that was a bigger drop than economists were expecting. mr. kernen? >> all right. getting all these things. so you like he's like bloomberg? no 16 ounce -- >> guy runs -- >> you know. >> no 16 ounce anything over that in sugared drinks. comments, questions about anything you see here on "squawk," e-mail us at squawk @c in.com. you can also follow us on twitter @squawkcnbc. still to come this morning, john mcafee. in the flesh. well he won't be here but on camera. in his first interview since arriving back in the states. an interview you've got to see. plus. have you seen these? want to know how to use them? one of the new ways retailers are hoping to win over consumers. we're going to explain qr codes. the bar code guy died yesterday. can i help you? i heard y
side not the call side. they basically said to me, hmm we're not concerned about greece. we're not concerned about the economy. why don't you have these put calls they're really almost for free. we bought puts so we didn't have a loss in that drawdown. then we listen again. and we didn't have to -- again, we don't have to be that smart. okay. we're not that smart. again, we get into the next time, and draghi is talking about this, that the other, talking about this put and boy he did. he gave away this put. people not listening to it. you know what we did when we heard about that? we got invested. and that worked too. then we got into this election and said boy doesn't look like the market is going to be happy about this election, because obama is going to win. whether or not that was right or wrong, and they're going toish concerned about the fiscal cliff. we took down our position again. now when the market went down again, we said, okay, what are we going to do now? hmm, they're giving away call puts. call premium now. call premium traded really cheap. what should we do?
approaches greece-like levels. and they went so far as to bond out their debt service. issuing bonds to pay their interest and that is just a true muni bond person. that is like a knife in the heart, pain. >> don't go anywhere. stick around for the rest of the hour. thank you for being here on this holiday. >> glad to be here. >> what are you looking at? >> nothing. >> the red. >> it's like orange on camera. >> it is a little orange. >> is this a holiday? you keep saying that. >> we've been doing all sorts of holiday things. really? >> so it is the holidays? >> yes, it is. >> i've got to get with it. anyway, coming up, how much you pay for something online could depend on where your computer is located. first, though -- >> i know. attention, boys and girls and santa fans everywhere. in a holiday tradition in north american air space defense demand or norad is ready to help you track the jolly old elf and his reindeer. the funniest line in vacation, the movie, christmas where they're at the dinner table and clark says that santa has been spotted coming across the border up north. and his cou
in the likes of portugal, ireland, some even to some degree in spain and greece. and that wouldn't have happened without the pressure in the markets. >> obviously. jim, we want to thank you very much for calling in on this new year's eve and wish you a happy 2013 to you, as well. >> happy new year's to you guys. good luck to you. >> things. >>> coming up, we're going to calm to some politicians and congress people. we have shelly moore-capito and congressman greg meeks of new york will join us on the show to talk about the biggest sticking points. at the top of the hour, vice chairman and republican policy committee chairman tom price will be our special guest. "squawk box" coming right back. this is america. we don't let frequent heartburn come between us and what we love. so if you're one of them people who gets heartburn and then treats day after day... block the acid with prilosec otc and don't get heartburn in the first place! [ male announcer ] one pill each morning. 24 hours. zero heartburn. impact wool exports from new zealand, textile production in spain, and the use of medical
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13